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Category: Dance

Everything from how to behave in class to dance survival tips can be found here!

Receiving corrections – how to be a good student 

Receiving corrections – how to be a good student 

Why do you go to dance? Is it a hobby? Is it a passion? Do you want to improve? Whatever the reason, when you attend a class, you will enevitably receive corrections from the teacher. Here is how you can be a humble student.

I touched up slight on corrections in my last blog post Class Etiquette http://danceniche.com/2017/05/30/class-etiquette-a-guide-to-good-class-manners  so I’m going to go into a bit more detail to help you.
Firstly, your teacher will assume you are there because you want to be there, and want to LEARN. If you truely want to learn your craft, and excel in it, you have to be humble. No one but no one is born a perfect dancer, you have to work for it. You have to realise your weaknesses and work 10 times harder on them.


ATTITUDE

Always remember, your teacher WANTS you to improve. They would not give a correction if they did not think you were capable of improving on it. They have faith in you! They don’t pick things out to be mean or embarrass you, it’s quite the opposite. So when you receive a correction, don’t see it as a negative thing, see it as an opportunity to impress your teacher. Prove to them you want to be there! Equally, don’t be offended by a correction. Watch your body language and always be thankful for recieving a correction.


MEMORY

Embarrassment is one thing, flippancy is another. You must REMEMBER what your corrections are. A good way to do this is to have a little notebook with you, and at the end of the class, write down any corrections you were given, while they are fresh in your mind. Once your teacher has given you something to work on, they expect just that. So if you’ve written them down and looked over them a couple of times through the week, you will be able to apply yourself more to those areas when doing that particular exercise. One step better than that, is actually WORK on them at home or in between classes! By practicing your errors over and over, you will slowly improve on them, to the point that one day, you won’t even have to think about doing it, your body will just automatically do it! Practice makes perfect!


LISTEN

Your teacher won’t be just giving corrections to you during class. They will be firing them out to anyone at any time that they spot something isn’t quite right. This does not mean that it doesn’t imply to you. Whenever you hear a correction, take it upon yourself to self critique. Ask yourself “am I doing that too?” If you are, you can go about fixing it. Even if you’re not, it will only make you aware of what technique is required for that particular aspect of the exercise. By doing this with every correction, you will be improving on your own technique tenfold. Never assume you don’t need a correction, check if you don’t!!!!

So please above all, don’t take it personally. Take it as a chance to shine. There is no better feeling than working hard on something, repetitively over and over, until finally you crack it! The sense of achievement is huge! You will be so proud of yourself, and so will your teacher. Go make them proud!
Alicia 💗

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Class etiquette – a guide to good class manners

Class etiquette – a guide to good class manners

We all know good manners cost nothing, simple P’s and Q’s (that’s Please and thank you for anyone not familiar with that term) are the very basics expected of you. But do you know what’s expected of you when you step into the studio or class? I’m here to enlighten you!

 

APPEARANCE

Most schools and studios will have a set uniform. It’s important to stick to this uniform for a couple of reasons. Firstly, like school, everyone will look exactly the same. No one will stand out for the wrong reasons, and if you go out as a group to an event, you’ll be easily recognised as to which dance school you attend. Secondly, your teacher will be able to see your body clearly. I know this might not sound appealing, but your teacher will be able to visibly see muscles that are/need to be engaged, so it will help with corrections, this helping to improve your technique.

Uniform should be kept clean and neat, no ladders in tights or holes in ballet slippers. Keep on top of when items go beyond a quick wash and repair.

Hair should always be neatly and securely off the face in a tight bun. Not only is it distracting for you and your teacher if you’re constantly fiddling with your hair, stopping you from fully concentrating on your dance, it’s also a health and safely risk. A whip in the eye from a loose ponytail or plait when executing a pirouette can do some real damage!

Both these aspects of appearance show your teacher you are serious about dance and your class and you’re ready to work hard.

PUNCTUALITY 

This is a biggie. It does not mean arriving when class is about to start. My teacher always used to say to us

“if you arrive on time, you’re already late”

Think of how long it takes everyone to enter the room, say their hellos, put on shoes and warm up. At least 10 minutes. So arriving as class is about to start will delay the class by that amount of time. Which might not sound a lot, but it soon accumulates over a few classes. That’s less dance time. Try and arrive 10-15 minutes before class, puwt on required shoes and do a little warm up. This means when you enter the room, you’re ready to start class with a warm body, meaning you’re less likely to injure yourself, and more able to execute the steps to your full potential.

INTERRUPTIONS

Always try and keep any interruptions to a minimum, but things will crop up, toilet brakes, loose ribbons, etc. Wait until your teacher has stopped talking, politely raise your hand and ask to be excused. If you are in the middle of an exercise, wait until the music has finished. Similarly, when coming back into the room, wait until you can hear the music stop before re entering. This is so you don’t distract your fellow dancers from what they are working on.

The same applies if you are late for class. Get ready outside of the class, and wait until the music has stopped before entering. This may not always be possible if you’re in back to back classes, all the more reason to make the transition as quick as possible. Apologise for being late to your teacher and quietly and quickly take your place, ready to start work. Your teacher does not want to hear lengthy excuses, nor do they need to, it will only delay class further. If you feel the need to explain, wait until class has finished and speak to them at the end.

DEMEANOUR 

Be mindful of how you act in class between exercises. Body language says a lot! Try not to fold your arms, slouch and sit and lean into one hip. These are all passive aggressive postures, and although you may not mean them to be, they may be interpreted differently by someone. Also it may give your teacher the impression that you’re not interested in being there or working on corrections.

If the teacher is giving you a correction, listen intently and look like you are. Also, give other stundents the same curtesy, keep quiet whilst someone else is receiving corrections, so they don’t miss anything.

Read about receiving corrections here Receiving corrections – how to be a good student 

GOOD BYES

You probably already do a set cutesy or bow at the end of class, but it’s good manners to thank the teacher again and say good bye as you are leaving, to show you really mean it. Don’t forget your fellow students too! But try to keep chit chat to a minimum. There will probably be another class on straight after yours, and you don’t want to hold their class up! If you have something to say, wait until you’re outside of class, then you can take as long as you like!

Some schools will vary how strict they are with these kinds of things, and all schools and teachers will differ. But it’s good to be aware of how to act and what may be expected of you, particularly if you are considering a career with a professional company.

I hope this has been of help and Ill use good manners by thanking you for taking the time to read this!

Alicia 💗

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Top 5 dance comp survival tips!

Top 5 dance comp survival tips!


Last week, I was at a dance comp (or festival, same thing) with my 6 year old daughter. She came 4th with both her dances, and her comp team as a whole, collected a hefty bunch of medals, go Team Elite! When I was younger, I also competed in dance competitions, so I’m in the unique position of having been a competitor AND now a dance mum. (which is WAY harder by the way, I’d much rather be on the stage, than watching my baby on it). Having experience from both sides means I have a few little gems of knowledge I’m going to share with you that will make comps a whole lot easier, whether you’re a seasoned pro, comp novice or part of the entourage.

#1 – Prepare in advance.

You don’t want to be worrying and rushing round the morning of the comp, looking for your stuff and potentially being late, the vibes could effect your performance. Write a list the night before of all the things you need, music, costume, make up, props, and have it all ready by the door. That way you can wake up and have a peaceful mind knowing everything is ready, so you can concentrate 100% on your routine. If you’re doing multiple dances, make a list for each dance, so nothing is forgotten.

#2 – Arrive early.

Make sure you plan to arrive a good 45 mins to an hour before your section is due to start. Comps sometimes run behind, but they also run ahead of time, don’t let yourself be rushed. An hour means you can see the stage or area you’ll be performing on, and perhaps even having a run through on it if there is a break, so it’s familiar to you.  Spacing is essential, so assess what adjustments you may need to bare in mind to make the most of the space you’re dancing in. You will also be able to apply your make up, and dreaded liquid eyeliner, to perfection, because you won’t be rushing!

#3 – Warm up.

Use your time before the section wisely, and warm up fully. It’s so important not only for execution of your steps, but safety too. If you’re body is not fully warm and limbered up before throwing yourself into a routine, it can cause injury. Look after your body! This goes for cooling down too, especially if it’s colder outside. To go from being super warm after just performing, to rushing on out after you’ve finished, can cause your muscles to contract quickly, leaving them tighter. This can cause injury the next time you dance (speaking from experience, pulled hamstring – not good). Spend 5 mins or so just doing some gentle flowing stretches to let your body cool down slightly before being exposed to the elements.

#4 – Team spirit.

Team morale is so important, it can really give a dancer a much needed extra boost. If you’re dancing before or after one of your other team members, it’s really nice to watch and cheer them on. It’s vital for building camaraderie between you, and having that extra support in the audience can make confidence soar. Also, don’t forget your fellow competitors in your section. It doesn’t matter if you came first, or didn’t get placed, it’s correct etiquette to congratulate everyone. A small “well done” is all that’s needed. It will show you are graceful in defeat if you didn’t get placed, and not too big for your boots if you did win. No one wants a reputation for being the resident diva!

#5 – Have fun!

Don’t let nerves get the better of you. Did you know, that the hormones responsible for nerves and excitement are EXACTLY the same?! The only difference – breathing, the amount of oxygen getting in your body and up to your brain. Taking slow, deep breaths will really keep your brain and body on the right side of excitement. Remember why you are there. You obviously love to perform and thrive off it, so enjoy every chance of performance you get. You’ve put in hours of practice to get you to this moment, don’t waste it. Go out there and show the adjudicator exactly why you’re here and what you’re made of! That buzz you’ll feel when the audience applause is so worth it!
There we have it. They might seem like obvious things, or they may not, but they are so important. If you’re competing, I hope they are of help to you. Let me know if you have any tips I’ve not included, they may help someone else too!

Break a leg everyone!

Alicia 💗

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Ballet gear on a budget

Ballet gear on a budget

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Last weekend I was shopping with my mum in London when in Miss Selfridge I spotted this gorgeous little top! The ballerina pink hue caught my eye first. Then I saw the back! A delicate ribbon interlaces all the way down and ties in a perfect bow at the bottom, echoing the crossing of ballet shoe ribbons. Sold! I have to say, the soft cotton and almost fleecy feel to the inside, make it increadibly comfortable to wear! And the slightly cropped and rolled hem is perfect for showing a little midriff, think peek-a-boo not Spice Girl! It’s perfect as a cutesy casual daywear top, but also would fit right in at the barre or warm up!

It got me thinking, what other little gems could I find in the high street that I could easily add to my ever growing dance wardrobe, spending a fraction of the price?! We all know how expensive proper dance attire can be, so what if we didn’t NEED to spend mega bucks on dance labels and instead could grande jeté our way to the till in some of our favourite high street shops with change to spare?! I’ve done the hard work for you and sourced some bargains that will have you feeling like a prima in the studio!

Let’s start with the basics, a Leo. Standard price around £30, going up to at least double for a top brand. I found this one in New Look, by Pink Vanilla. £14.  Super flattering black hides a multitude of sins. The v -neck plunge will lengthen the neck area and make the most of those collarbones, and the cap sleeves will widen the top half, making it perfect to even out the peachiest of derrières!FullSizeRender 3

Ballet tights are a must, especially if, like me, you have areas you wish to cover in a class full of young whipper snappers half your age! These are from Topshop. 80 denier just just right thickness wise, and a delicate shade of pink. £6. And if you like, you can easily transform them into convertibles by snipping a small hole in the sole. Job done!FullSizeRender

If you want to express your personality in class, add a splash of colour! These gorgeous striped wool joggers are a steal for Gap. Down from £34 to £14.99 in the sale! Ideal for warm up before class! And I’m loving the little drawstring detail at the waist!

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Every ballerina since time began, from babies to ladies in their eighties, absolutely needs a wrap over cardigan. It’s a ballet staple! This one is from Jane Norman and comes in an assortment of colours, but I like this pale grey one the best. Another v-neck, but it’s so flattering, so why not?! And the pretty tie side makes it quick and easy to take off once your’re ready, yet won’t get in your way if you keep it on during winter months. It’s the most expensive item at £29, but for something that you can wear to class AND double up as every day wear, basically means you’re getting 2 tops for the one price! Bargain!FullSizeRender 2

If you’d rather not stare at your derrière in the mirror all class, a skirt is another must. Not only will it skim over and lumps and bumps, but as soon as you put one on, you’ll feel as graceful as Giselle and won’t be able to resist doing a pirouette (or 2 or 3 if you’re feeling brave) to show it off. I found this one from New Look. I find by matching the colour of your skirt and your leotard, it will really lenghthen your whole appreance. It was £5 in the sale! Take my money!

FullSizeRender 4So there you have it, my top 5 ballet gear bargains. And the great thing is, they could all be worn outside of the studio too, transitional ballet wear! Let me know if you’ve found any little gems on the high street.

Much love,

Alicia

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