Meet the Founder

 

Wondered how Dance Niche came to be? Come and read about how it all began and the face behind it!

Meet our founder

Get In Touch

 

Here at DNHQ, we love to connect with our followers, it is called ‘social‘ media after all! Leave us a message on here or any of our other platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and we will gladly reply!

Let’s Work Together

 

Are you in the dance or arts genre? Do you have a business that relates and want to team up? Here’s where to start.

Let’s work together

Author: aliciajell

History Of Tap | Origins, Founders & Developers Of Tap Dance

History Of Tap | Origins, Founders & Developers Of Tap Dance

Tap dancing, as we know, has many different, distinct styles, almost sub genres, but where and how did this rythmical toe tapping start and how did it develop into what we know it to be today?

FOUNDING NAMES.

No one really knows the true origins of tap dancing, but perhaps the earliest reference, dating back to the 1800’s, is the Juba Dance, originally performed by Master Juba aka William Henry Lane. His style was described as percussive, well timed, expressive and varied in tempo, ranging from smooth to frenzied. Juba was one of the first black performers to dance for a white audience, and although starting in America, he was most popular in England. It was most certainly a style like no one had seen before! It’s thought to have been derived from African tribal persuasions and plantation dances.

At the time, it was rare for black dancers to perform as a solo due to a 2 coloured rule, so many early black performers did so as a duet, notably Buck & Bubbles. Ford Buck Washington would play the piano, and John Bubbles Sublett would tap. It’s documentented that their style was a ‘class act’ often wearing tuxedos. This was said to be a conscious effort to move away from the earlier Minstrels dancing clown appearance. Tuxedos are now a popular choice for tappers, particularly in the Broadway/musical theatre style. However Bubbles particular style was heavy on percussive heel beats and lower body movements, which is said to be the origins of today’s rhythm tap. We talked about rhythm tap in a previous article, and how it seems to be helping to popularize tap again in modern day culture. You can read it here ……..Tap Dance Revival! The Decline & Resurrection

Bill Bojangles Robinson is another famous tapper, famous in the early 1900’s. Originally one half of a duo with George Cooper, they achieved great success touring with their act, but Bojangles found the height of his career when he paired with Shirley Temple , and went in to have many leading roles in the movies. America celebrate National Tap Dance Day on 25th May, chosen because it is Bill Bojangles Robinson’s birthday.

Hot on the heels came The Nicholas Brothers, Fayard & Harold. They quickly rose to fame by adding somewhat acrobatic and extravagant moves to their dancing, notably leagfroging over one another and falling into the splits and rising again without using their hands! Their style was well out together and classy, always remaining under control.

There have been many other contributors to the world and genre of tap, too many to mention individually, but other names that deserve a mention are The Whitman Sisters, Brenda Buffalino, The Clark Brothers, and Gregory Hines.

DEATIALS.

Initially, the original tap styles were done in regular soft shoes, with a smooth, graceful technique, often called The Sand Dance, and perhaps where the grass the soft shoe shuffle was coined. It then developed to hard boots with strong heels, but it’s worth noting that the metal taps didn’t appear till around 1910.

Tap so has it’s own glossary of steps, which are closely linked to the developers and founders of the steps. Examples are, Buffalo, Bojangles, Suzi Q, wings, shuffles, minstrel, shimsham, riffs, rolls. Each step can be traced back to a particular date in time, influences and style.

Tap dance also continues to evolve. There are a number of new tap dancing influencers, regenerating tap for the new generation, each adding their own individual style and flare to the genre. The Arnold Sisters – Chloe and Maude, Jared ‘Grimey’ Grimes are a couple of examples stateside, where tap, particularly the rhythm style seems to be most popular. Heading up in the UK, friends Jamie Spall and Kate Ivory Jordan are hoping to make rhythm tap more commercialised by bringing their tap events to the masses! We wrote about their efforts and what exactly goes on at a tap festival in our previous article Brighton Tap Festival

To conclude, although the exact origins are fuzzy and uncertain, tap dancing has a rich history of founders and influences, which are still evident in all the various styles of tap we have today, and understanding those origins will surely help dancers and students to grasp the technique and the required style, further enhancing their craft.

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Flexibility At What Cost? Alixa Sutton Talks

Flexibility At What Cost? Alixa Sutton Talks

The world, and certainly our social media feeds are awash with hyper flexibile poses and stunts, each one more jaw dropping than the next. Each person trying to push their bodies to the absolute limit. But at what cost? Yes, they are young now, their bodies are mailable and have been trained to be so for many years, but do we truly know the consequences of such extremism further down the line for these dancers, when ageing and all that that entails comes knocking?

The risks of hyper flexibility and over stretching are certainly a topic in their own right, but one person who knows the perils of over stretching from experience is Alixa Sutton. Alixa created a safe flexibility programme, which is so successful and achieves almost instantaneous results that she travels world wide, taking her skills and passing them on to the future generation of dance. We chatted to Alixa about her background, reasons for creating the programme and general thoughts on flexibility in today’s world of dance.

DN: Alixa, tell us about yourself and the reasons behind setting up your own flexibility programme.

A.S: I come from a Rhythmic Gymnastics background, and then went into Circus Contortion.  All my career I had traditional coaches & teachers who believed in the old style methods of stretching.  As an athlete & artist, I had one injury after another.  All the injuries finally acclimated in me breaking my back, and being barley able to walk for a year, let alone train or perform.  This was such an eye opening experience for me, as it made me realize that there was another way of doing things.  I also never wanted to see my students go through what I had.  I spent the next few years studying & learning from doctors, physical therapists, reading every single study I could find on all the new information we have now about how the body works and what is best for the body.  Then I took this information and incorporated it into the practical knowledge I have about dance, gymnastics, and contortion.  I have created a method that works for every body type, age and level of flexibility- but safely.

DN: How long has the programme been running?

AS: I have been teaching the Alixa Flexibility Method for 20 years now, but we have just expanded into doing Instructor Courses the past 2 years.  I also have to say that the program is constantly changing. One of the issues is that children’s bodies are different now than 20 years ago!  Some teachers may have noticed that the younger students are much tighter than in years past.  This is because the children sit so much now, and at younger ages.  They actually cause their hips to fix in a rounded position, shorten their hamstrings, and cause a huge muscle build up in their spines from all the rounding & sitting they do.  As teachers, the “traditional” stretches we used to use to improve flexibility, just don’t work anymore as we are trying to apply them to a different type of body.  I am constantly creating new stretches to help open the body naturally through mobility &

extension.

DN: Can you tell us some of your success stories?

AS : Oh goodness there are so many!!  Just this week I had a teenage girl who came into my course and told me I shouldn’t even bother with her as she was just horrible and would never be flexible.  I told her to wait and see.  At the end of the two hours, she came over and gave me a big hug crying and said she couldn’t even believe the difference she had seen & felt.  

A dance teacher took one of my Instructor Courses to help improve her teaching.  Several months later she wrote me that she was having so much pain with her own body that she was unable to walk. She started using my stretches daily and in 2 weeks was able to go on a hiking vacation with her family.

A student came to me and stated that she wanted to be a contortionist.  She was so tight in her shoulders, she couldn’t do a bridge and get her head off the floor. Her hips were also extremely tight.  We worked very slowly & steadily to improve her, and 4 years later she got her dream and was working as a contortionist in Cirque du Soleil.

(A before and after of one of Alixa’s clients)

DN: What drives you?

AS: Definitely what drives my is seeing the joy in students.  I love seeing someone who was always in pain feel better, or having that student who felt like a failure light up because they have had a success.  Flexibility is hard work, there is nothing easy about it in the beginning if you do it correctly, but it is so rewarding to see the changes in the students and to see them gradually become naturally flexible and to love doing it.  It is the best feeling when you able to give the tools to a student to help them improve and to hopefully stop them from being injured before it happens.

DN: What do you hate to see the most that’s currently in the industry?

AS: Improper technique.  It is very easy to do things wrong, and the students like to do everything on their good leg, or with their hips unsquared etc. because it is much easier.  But not doing flexibility in the correct alignment or on both sides equally, is so damaging to the body!  I think a perfect example is with back flexibility.  Most students use their middle/lower back to bend at because it is easiest and their cores are weak.  To do back flexibility correctly, they need good core strength and to use their hip flexibility & upper back/shoulders- not their middle/lower backs.  This takes longer to learn and is not as much fun, as students have to focus on good technique.  However, it will be the difference between having back pain & problems later on, or being safe & having a healthy spine their entire lives.

DN: What would you say is your no.1 tip tip for safe stretching?

This is a tricky question because I don’t think you can nail it down to one.  

1st I would say correct alignment & technique is very important during stretching.  

2nd It is important to relax.  I use mobility exercises with all my stretches to help the body relax, and to assist students who are very stuck improve more quickly & gently.

3rd  Making sure you stretch all areas of the body.  For example, ballet students tend to focus on turn out as they need it so desperately.  However, they often make themselves very flexible in one area and neglect others, creating imbalances which then cause overuse injuries.   They can improve much more quickly by stretching the glute & IT band areas which will open up their hip flexibility overall.

The Alixa Flexibility Programme offers student workshops, teacher certification courses and specialist contortion programmes. It’s currently on its extensive tour of the U.S, followed by Australia, the U.K and Canada. For more information on courses, locations and dates, please see the website following this link Alixa Flexibility

Safe stretching!

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Fame The Musical | UK Tour

Fame The Musical | UK Tour

Fame is synonymous with the 80’s, shiny spandex and a myriad of coloured leg warmers.  Following the huge success of the original 1980 film, a subsiquent spin-off series was aired, and the immensely talented cast also went on to have a string of creative successes of their own. So the word ‘FAME’ is heavily ingrained in people’s minds, and hearts, but just how well would this new 30th anniversary musical production stand up to the die hard Fame fanatics (myself included) , I was about to find out.

Sat in the auditorium of The Palace Theatre Manchester, there is a buzz of excitement like I’ve never known before a production. As everyone takes their seats, theres a burst of brightly coloured neon lights, and we open on a drummer and guitarist playing the oh-so-familiar chords of a certain ‘light up the sky like a flame’ song. But its just a tantalisingly  slither, as we realise its the beginning scene of auditions at New York’s Performing Arts School. (You can read our advice about auditions here Top Audition Hacks ) We then cut intermintenly to the other auditionees, until the final line up is revealed.

We soon get to the nitty gritty of the production with the freshman year, “a discovery of self” proclaims Mr Myres, the resident drama teacher, (played by Cameron Johnson). We get to meet the main characters, suitably nervous and unsure in disposition, well, apart from the gregarious, larger than life Joe, played effortlessly by Albey Brookes, who knows where the actor end and the character begins?!

Nick Piazza, played by Keith Jack (who shot to fame in the BBC series ‘Any Dream Will Do’) is a serious classical actor, solely focused on honing his skills, and oblivious to the romantic advances of his classmates, Serena Katz aka Molly McGuire, who’s vocals will blow you away in contrast to her nerdy and unasuming character!

We meet Tyrone jackson, (Jamal Crawford) who plays a typical wayward teen, angry at the injustice in the world, particularly surrounding race, but who’s passion and natural flare for dance carry him through. He is instantly attracted to Iris Kelly (Jorgie Porter of Hollyoaks fame) who’s a prima ballerina in the making with all the airs and graces that seemingly come with it. She confides in him that its all an act and she desperately poor, and once her guards are down, they become romantically involved.

Fiery latina Carmen Diaz is played by Stephanie Rojas, is ravenous for fame and will stop at nothing to reach her goal. She strikes up an unlikely partnership with Schlomo (Simon Anthony) a classical trained violinist, who’s father is also a famous violinist, but who’s rather be tickling the ivories of a piano, and sets up a rock band. Mr Sheinkopf is the German music teacher, and vocal about his dislike for rock and roll.

Lambchops played by Louisa Beadal, is the rock chic tomboy, who is the drummer of the band, never taking school seriously, and is constantly mocked by Goody, the trumpet player in the band, for being ‘a girl’.

Then there is Mabel Washington aka Hayley Johnston. She’s a talented dancer/singer, but struggles to reign in her love for food, and consequently, her weight, to the dismay of resident choreographer, Miss Bell, played by Katie Warsop.

All this is headed up by Principal Miss Sherman, (renowned Mica Paris) who’s comes down hard on the kids for not performing well enough academically, but truly loves and cares for every one of them and has the best interests at heart.

The quality of the dancing throughout the show is tremendous, and the energy never wains! We are treated to technically beautiful ballet scenes. Jorgie Porter positively glows whilst executing them, nailing double pirouettes into arabesques effortlessly! (Jorgie told us about her previous dance training when we interviewed her during a press afternoon. You can read about it here Jorgie Porter Talks Fame The Musical ) In stark contrast, the hip hop and jazz styles certainly pack a punch, as do the enviable leg extensions by the ensemble! The whole cast take on each genre with finesse and sense of style, completely maliable and adaptable, which are sought after characteristics in they arts.

Dance and music go hand in hand, and the live instrumentals played by the multitalented cast are seamlessly woven into each scene. You truly believe you are peering in on a band rehearsal, jamming away. As for the vocals, you will be left with goosebumps, multiple times. Keith Jack has a way of story telling to his singing, perfect for the stage. Molly’s high notes are angelic to the ear. Stephanie has a real raw quality to her voice, in perfect harmony to what her character goes through. And last but certainly not least, Mica’s soulful and earthy rendition of “These are my children” received a standing ovation from the audience, mid scene! She blasts out the lyrics without loosing a drop of sincerity, in what is a completely believable emotion and performance.

The show takes us on a journey from freshman year, to senior year show, in which you see the journey the characters make, as they blossom and fulfil their destinies. Those years are melted away by clever snippets of dialogue and scenes to show progression of time. This means there are huge amounts of swift changes for the cast and scenery, but its done in a way to mimic the fast paced nature of being in the arts. Subtle effects like the hushed sound of traffic in the background, add to the believability of New York life. I also have to mention the wonderful addition of the original cast of Fame headshots are illuminated as the backdrop, which light and fade echoing who’s currently in the scene. The journey ends with the whole auditorium on its feet, dancing and singing your cares away to the title song track, in what is almost an immersive theatre experience! I defy you not to join in!

Fame is as relevant and real now, as it was back in the 80’s. Controversial topics such as discrimination, race, drugs, teen angst and unrequited love hit home to many. Being a performing arts student, putting yourself on show and subject to criticism is a tough job, one made incessantly harder by dealing with the normal difficulties of growing up. To quote Miss Bell ” artists are special” and if you’ve got a special something within you, you need to work hard, fight to let it shine and the rewards will be limitless.

The production is currently running at the Palace and Opera House Manchester until 28th July 18, before embarking on it’s mamouth nationwide tour, ending August 2019. To find your nearest venue, dates, and how to book, visit the official website Fame The Musical UK Tour

FAME LIVES FOREVER

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Jorgie Porter Talks Fame The Musical

Jorgie Porter Talks Fame The Musical

We spoke with Jorgie about her upcoming role as Iris Kelly in the new production of Fame, her dance background, how she prepared for the role and advice for pre-professionals who want to succeed in dance or performing arts.

Marching through the busy streets of Manchester, I finally arrived at Studio 25, purpose built dance Studios with all the mod cons. As I’m guided through, I get a glimpse of Jorgie through the window, finishing off her previous interview – this girl is busy! She was in London appearing on a t.v show only the night previous, getting the first morning train to Manchester and heading straight into photo shoots, PR events and interviews. Oh the life of a pro!

I’m ushered in and greeted with a beaming, infectious smile and energy to rival a 2 year old after a nap! Her aura is open and sincere and I’m immediately at ease. It takes no time at all for us to strike up a conversation.

D.N Fame is such an iconic dance movie (which we included in our all time top dance movie list Top Dance Movies You Need To Watch ) Had you watched it growing up?

J.P – It wasn’t really my era, it was more the music. When you’re in dance school and do a show, music from Grease and other films are always used, as was music from Fame. I remember opening a show with a kick *demonstrates* to a Fame track. Obviously I’ve seen every show and production of it now, I needed to find out ‘who am I?!’

D.N – Your character, Iris, is a trained classical dancer. Can you tell us a little about your training?

J.P – So I danced from when I was 3, with my local ballet teacher. She was like a second mum to us. We adored her, never wanted to put a foot wrong, we respected her. I learnt so much self respect and discipline through ballet. She then encouraged me to audition and I was offered a scholarship at The Hammond in Chester, a prestigious college. It’s been 10 years and I’ve been so lucky to do Hollyoaks in between, but now coming back to it, I’m so much more confident.

D.N – Iris puts on a facade of being wealthy and upper class. Is it easy to be drawn into pretending to be something your not, in the industry your in?

J.P – Obviously with acting, it’s different, you’re pretending to be a different character. My friends literally save my life! It’s a lot harder to pretend or hide when you’ve got friends around. Iris Kelly doesn’t have that, but she finds it in a romantic relationship with Tyrone Jackson, that’s why they become so close, so tight. She opens up to him about being poor. As a kid, you think not having the right clothes and trainers matter, it’s a big deal. The show deals with so much issues, it’s so good!

D.N – You said you had 10 years off dance. How did you prepare for this role?

J.P – Basically, rehearsals for this have been enough! It’s mind boggling! When your mind has moved away from making your body move, it takes a little while to reconnect it. Rehearsals are so intense, every day, with everyone! Some are just out of college and have so much energy, amazing! I’m so lucky to be in it with them! All your training comes back, you have to do it full out every time. You know know, to be better, you just have to try harder.

D.N – Do you go en pointe in the production?

J.P – I can do pointe, but the fact that the tour is so long and a lot of the stages are so raked, I didn’t want to do it it and have to come off it. I didn’t want to jeopardise the whole show for one night of brilliant pointe shoe movement. I’d love to do pointe all the way through, it’s just not ideal. There’s other dances in it like street dance, and there’s just no time, it’s so fast paced this show!

D.N – Lastly, what advice would give anyone who’s wanting to peruse a career in dance or the stage?

J.P – It is the hardest thing ever! If you aren’t fully immersed into the hard work, if you think you’re going to have an easy time, it’s not for you. You have to take criticism and make it into a good thing, because you will get criticised no matter what.

(You can read our advice on how to take criticism and corrections here Receiving Corrections- How to be a good student )

You can watch the rest of the interview over on our Instagram page @danceniche using the new IGTV feature or on our YouTube channel using this link Jorgie Porter Fame Full Interview

Fame is premiering Friday 20th July at The Palace & Opera House Manchester, where it runs until 28th July. You can buy tickets through the website https://www.atgtickets.com/shows/fame-the-musical/palace-theatre-manchester/ or by calling 0844 871 3019. The Production then heads off to Glasgow to continue its nationwide tour lasting until August 2019! More more information on dates and venues, you can visit the official Fame The Musical website http://fameuktour.co.uk/

#famelivesforever

#iwannaliveforever

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Brighton Tap Festival | A Family Affair

Brighton Tap Festival | A Family Affair

You’ve probably all heard of some amazing tap festivals held around the world, America, Barcelona, Stockholm to name a few, but where are the UK ones?! Let me tell you all about the new kid on the uk tap block!

Founded in 2015 and born from a family love for the genre, 4 women, (2 mums and 2 daughters) decided to put their best feet forward and bring tap to the masses here in Great Britannia. Brighton Tap Festival is the brain child of Karen Spall, Jamie Spall, Sarah Ivory and Kate Ivory-Jordan. Jamie and Kate have been tappers since the were tots, and have since shuffled their way around the world, dancing and learning from some of the best teachers and fellow hoofers. Whilst on their travels, they noticed the huge interest and popularity of tap dancing in other countries, yet the UK lacked the same enthusiasm. You can read our thoughts about why this might be on our previous article Tap Revival – The Decline And Resurrection . Keen tappers would have to travel out of the country, and as such incur great travelling expenses that some would be unable to justify, despite their tapping passion. And so the girls sought to change that and Brighton Tap Festival was established.

WHAT’S INVOLVED

The festival itself is a 3 day event open to anyone with a love for tap. It caters for every age and ability, from beginners to more advanced, and professional levels, so everyone will feel comfortable but still have the option to challenge themselves. Classes and workshops run throughout the day, then make way for the evening events. Here’s where the festival comes into its own!

The first is the Tap Jam, where willing participants are invited into the stage and improvise to live jazz music played by the Michele Drees Trio, what a treat! If you’ve never danced to live accompaniment before, you need to give it a go at least once. There is something so spine tingly special about it. The music literally vibrates through you, giving your dancing an incomparable quality.

Next up is the Cutting Competition where competitors will stomp it out against each other to win prizes. The key is to maintain rhythm whilst impressing the judges, so any personal flair is sure to be well received! Perhaps some homework watching the great Gene Kelly or Fred Astaire might come in useful!

Lastly is the Gala Night, a perfect way to conclude the festival. The whole faculty give a performance alongside some of the biggest UK hoofing talent, with live music from Michele Drees again. Jamie Spall had this advice, “The Gala is always the best event of the festival, and if I could recommend attending only one, it would be this one!”

Don’t worry though, there’s no obligation to participate in the evening festivities. They hold so much entertainment, good music and phenomenal talent, that you can simply buy a ticket and immerse yourself in the electric atmosphere!

TICKETS

The festival have a tiered system. The lowest is a 2 class pass. This enables you to attend any 2 classes of your choice over the entire weekend, perfect if you can’t commit to a set day or just popping in and out. You can also choose from a 1,2 or 3 day pass, giving you access to all the classes taking place on the day(s) you’ve selected. Workshops and evening events are extra and tickets need to be purchased separately, unless, that is, you go for the all inclusive pass, which does exactly what it says on the tin!

DETAILS

For 2018, the festival will run from 31st Aug -2nd Sept. Boasting some of the most admired and influential tappers of the current generation, including Jason Janas, Derick Grant , Adele Joel and the D’Angelo Bros to name a few. Jamie and Kate will also be taking classes! Visit the website www.brightontapfestival.org.uk for tickets and more information. What’s more is the girls have kindly organised a discount code for you, our readers! Send them a message through the contact page of their website and quote DANCENICHE which entitles you to 20% off ticket prices! What other excuse do you need?!

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
To The Dancers Who Are Afraid Of Taking The Next Step

To The Dancers Who Are Afraid Of Taking The Next Step

This article comes from the heart, and is a very personal one, but one that I want to give others the courage that may be lacking in taking that next step in their dance career.

At the age of 17, after dancing for 5 nights a week since I was around 12 (I was a late starter) I turned my back on dance. I’d taken all the higher grades exams I could and everyone else in my class were going on to do teaching qualifications or (successfully) auditioning for full time dance education. I wanted so desperately to perform – to dance, yet lacked any self confidence in perusing a career. I had all the artistry and enthusiasm yet lacked what I would call a ‘typical‘ dancers body. I stood at a petite 5″1, predisposed to carrying weight on my upper thighs and bum, and forward facing hip sockets rendered my natural range of turnout almost non existent. In my head, I knew exactly what and how my body should be executing elements, yet my body was unable to comply. I would never ‘fit in’, I would never be ‘good enough’, I would never be successful in auditioning, and so I didn’t.

I was angry and biter at the world of dance. How could it be so biased to judge a dancer on such things that are out of their control, as opposed to seeing the sheer joy and the ability to project emotions whilst dancing?! Isn’t that what the true artistry of Dance is all about?! And so I shut the door on it completely. I left dance and never looked back.

Fast forward 17 years, I take adult classes, and have begun my career as a dance teacher. Dance will now always be a part of my life, and for that, I am forever grateful. I also have a family, with 2 young girls, so I would not change a single thing, but I always wonder ‘what if?What if I’d been brave enough to audition? What if I’d gone to full time dance education? Would I have succeeded? Would I have had improved my ability, honed my craft? I will never know.

And there lies the point of this article. If you don’t at least try, you will never know what the answer will be. Ok, it might not be the outcome you’d hope for, but at least you’d have give it your best shot. You could walk away confidently knowing you tried your very best but perhaps it wasn’t meant to be, and so find a different path to walk. Please don’t let opportunities pass you by without at least giving it a chance. What’s the worst that could happen?! You don’t get in?! So what! You pick yourself up, dust yourself off and carry on. Better than living with regret.

Regret is such a tragic emotion. To torment ourselves with the ‘what ifs and buts’ is cruel and self destructive. We can not rewrite the past. What is done, is done. No one knows the future or what lies ahead for us on our path. All we can hope for is that when we arrive at one of many cross roads, that we will take the path that most serves us, and trust in our own judgement.

Believe me when I say you have to chase down your dreams and fight to keep them alive. Have faith in your abilities, which are unique to you. Dr Seuss had the right idea;

Today you are you, that is truer than true, there is no one alive that is youer than you!

What makes you different, sets you apart from the crowd, makes you stand out, makes you shine! Go to as many auditions as you can. Yes that may mean a lot of rejection, but somewhere, someone is looking for that unique quality that you possess. You have to go find them.

If you want to take the next step but are unsure on how to go about it, talk to your dance teacher, they would be both honoured and proud to help you. You can also read our article about audition hacks to help take the guessing work out of it and put any anxieties to bed. Read it here Audition Hacks – Advice For Dance Auditions You Need To Know About

Above all, I want you to have courage. Have courage to follow your passion, charge at it head on and don’t stop until you get there. What happens after that, who can tell, but there’s only one way to find out…………..

What if I fall? Oh, but my darling, what if you fly? Erin Hanson

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Mental Health In Dancers | Why Is No-one Talking About It?

Mental Health In Dancers | Why Is No-one Talking About It?

We are historically inept at discussing our mental health in every day life, and even more so for dancers in the arts industry. We are here to highlight these uncomfortable conversations in the hope they become that little bit less uncomfortable.

Discussing mental health will always be a taboo. In recent times, we have seen a rise in celebrities talking about their own mental health battles, along with the subject being more present in the media. Specific organisations are campaigning to thrust it to the forefront of people’s awareness, in the hope of breaking down the wall of silence that surrounds the stigma.

Statistics inform us that 1 in 4 people are plagued with mental health issues right now. Just using that statistic alone means that within your group of friends, at least one of them will be suffering behind closed doors. Now look at a dance class, how many dancers take part, and apply the same statistic, alarming isn’t it. But what’s even more alarming is that there are virtually no studies specifically on mental health in dancers. Why? Entertainment Assist are an Australian organisation conducted a study on dancers and found their statistics to be even more dire than the general consensus – 1 in 3 dancers were suffering. An alarming figure considering no one is addressing it.

Exercise – specifically dance, has long been proven to help improve mental health and cognitive functions. This coupled with the display of euphoria projected by dancers during performances , could be the reason we are still inadequately addressing mental health and well-being of those in this chosen field. Do we assume that they aren’t affected? That they can’t possibly be affected because they are doing what they love and look how happy they are! There lies the problem. We assume. Assume that because they ‘look’ happy whilst they perform that they are the same whilst at home. How wrong could we be. There are so many reasons why dancers suffer, body dysmorphia, eating disorders, obsessive tendencies are just a few to mention, let alone the huge come down after the high of performing, it’s a rollercoaster of emotions.

We are honoured to be alliances with Terry Hide MA MBACP, ex professional dancer with London Festival Ballet (now English National Ballet) turned psychotherapist. He uses his first hand knowledge of the industry coupled with his expertise in the psychology field to specifically help dancers that are suffering behind the scenes and highlight their plight so that we can be better at identifying the signs, addressing the issues and ultimately support those that need it the most. He gave us some advice for dancers and their nearest and dearest or recognising symptoms and taking the first steps towards getting help.

Some Symptoms

You may find yourself wanting to be alone when you are normally gregarious. You may also be feeling tearful, tired or lethargic and irritable. Another common symptom is being short tempered with people you are close with. You may feel fearful of something but you don’t know what the something is. You may may have lost your appetite or obsessively control your eating (the start of anorexia/bulimia). You could also become controlling in other aspects of your life. These are only a few of the symptoms that you may experience. As mentioned above, each one of us is unique and therefore the symptoms will manifest themselves in different ways. In addition to the above symptoms, there are other factors to take into consideration. Hormonal issues around menarche, puberty, adolescence and for females, the menstrual cycle.

Most importantly, symptoms are a manifestation of underlying issues and your body’s warning that you need to deal with them. Unfortunately, the worldwide medical profession, on the whole, only treat the symptoms, usually by medication, rather than dealing holistically with a patient to find out what is creating the symptoms.

Being a ‘rock’ in isolation and being ‘strong’ is sometimes detrimental to oneself as it saps energy from our own self-healing system. The British resolve of the ‘stiff upper lip’ doesn’t work at all, it only exacerbates the problem by keeping it inside of us, which is toxic to our mental and physical health. For you to ask for help when you recognise the symptoms, is in itself the first step to healing. For some who are normally resistant to showing signs of ‘weakness’, asking for help is the bravest step.

If you identify any of these symptoms in yourself or someone close to you, as Terry said, the first and bravest step is recognising there is a problem. Problems don’t go away on their own, and if your mind is not working at its optimum best, how do expect dance, your craft, to be? If you can’t or don’t feel comfortable confiding in your nearest and dearest, reach out to one of the many organisations, fully trained, many having had their own first hand experience with mental health issues, who are ready to support you.

MIND are a mental health charity set up to help those in need or just be an unbiased eat to listen. You can visit their website www.mind.org.uk , call their helpline 0300 123 3393 or text 86463 . Terry Hyde also has a website for his services specific to those in dance www.counsellingfordancers.com or through Facebook: @counsellingfordancers

Twitter: @counselingdance

Instagram: @counselingfordancers . Alternatively you can contact us here at Dance Niche, and we would be more than happy to pass on any questions or worries you have to Terry.

Please remember, you are not on your own. Many people before you have had their own mental health issues and made it through the other side, and many people after you will suffer. It is much more common than anyone cares to make out, but it’s only when we talk about it and face it head on, that any progress can be made. Don’t suffer in silence, someone is always ready to listen.

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Dance Nutrition | A Dancer’s Guide On How To Fuel The Body

Dance Nutrition | A Dancer’s Guide On How To Fuel The Body

There is a huge misconception that dancer’s – particularly ballerinas, don’t eat, always on a diet, or have eating disorders. Sadly, whilst the latter maybe true for a lot of dancers (a whole other article in itself) this is simply not true. Read on to find to find out exactly what and when full time dance students should be eating to correctly fuel their bodies.

Firstly, there is no way a professional dancer could perform night after night, after training and rehearsing all day and still keep their bodies strong, at their peak, and with optimum energy stores, not to mention longevity of career, without eating sufficiently. They have to eat, and eat intelligently and mindfully. Of course, they have access to nutritional experts to guide them and help them to stay on top of their game. But what about students?? Young girls and boys who dance all day throughout the week, learning and honing their craft. The way they fuel their body will not be the same as the professionals just yet, but they will still need to be consuming a fair amount, to help their bodies build the muscles needed to be a strong and competent performer. THIS is what I want to educate to these young adults, at a time when their bodies have been through some hugely significant changes and undoubtedly begin to compare themselves to other dancers they may meet. I want to shatter these misconceptions that can manifest into something that ultimately shatters careers – and lives.

A few weeks ago, I sat down with Laura Harrison from Dynamics Chester. She was a dancer, has a degree in Sports science, MSC in nutrition and now runs her own fitness centre. If anyone would truly understand the demands of a dancer AND be able to back that up with sound, nutritional advice, it’s her! We put our heads together and came up with a healthy eating guide for full time dance students and dancers who are consistently training throughout the week and want to maintain their current weight/fitness. Laura was keen to stress “This guide will be a very general idea on the types of food students should be eating and how often, to get them through their current dance programmes, maintain their energy levels and help to build the very muscles they are honing during training. This will also differ slightly depending on the physique and build of the dancer and how many hours training they do, but in the whole it’s a good source of information to educate dancers on nutrition”

BREAKFAST

As the old saying goes, it’s the most important meal of the day, and Laura agrees “Breakfast kick starts your day and wakes your body and metabolism up! It’s a good idea to make sure it’s high in protein to help stabilise blood sugar levels from the start” Ideal foods include eggs (poached, boiled, scrabbled) salmon, avocados, brown bread and porridge.

Breakfast cereals are one to avoid. They generally have lots of hidden sugars on them, which if you consume at the start of the day, will cause your sugar levels to rise to a high peak, which in turn will cause a crash mid morning (hello elevenses). Fresh fruit juice also has a hidden sugar agenda! Laura informs “a typical 25ml glass of fresh fruit juice contains up to 22g of sugar!” So while juice is a good contributor to your daily fruit and veg intake, it’s a good idea to limit your serving, adding water to dilute the amount.

LUNCH

Lunch is the meal half way between your day. You’ve already been dancing for a good few consecutive hours, but still have the rest of the day to go, so you need to keep your energy levels up. “You’ll need protein and carbs to sustain you” Laura continues, “……a ratio to 2-1 protein to carbs is a good rule of thumb to stick too, not forgetting lots of veg and greens.”

Ideal sources of protein would be chicken or turkey. White meats are more easily digested by the body and are much leaner. Eggs and fish like tuna and Mackerel are also great additions.

Carb options would be Brown rice, quinoa, lentils and pulses. Brown pasta, bread and potatoes are also carb rich, but they may leave you feeling to bloated and ‘heavy’ to continue to dance on, so eat those sparingly.

Green veg like broccoli, spinach and kale are perfect, but any veg will boost your vitamin and mineral intake! There’s a saying Laura likes, ‘eat the rainbow’ which basically means your plate needs to be packed full of colourful veg and fruit, not just beige carbs.

DINNER

“The idea of your evening meal is to replenish the carbs you have been burning off all day” says Laura, “although you should try and make your evening meal the smallest, so you’re not going to bed on a full stomach. The body finds it much more difficult to digest food whilst the body is in sleep state. It’s best to try and eat your dinner within the hour you have finished dancing, to adequately replenish your stores of energy.”

Brown rice and pasta are good examples of evening meals, just watch portion control. Fish and meat can be your protein sources, just like your lunch. Salads work well as an evening meal, offering a lighter meal before settling down, and an easy way to include your veg and up your leafy greens intake.

SNACKS

Laura is an advocate for snacking, “Snacks are ideal for in between meals and important to keep your blood sugar levels constant and consistent, avoiding the peak and dips effect. You just need to be mindful and intelligent with your choices.”

Fruit and veg are ideal to snack on. Apples are a great source of fibre to aid digestion, bananas are packed with protein, carrot and cucumber sticks are perfect as well. Protein snack balls are good for a boost, as are nuts and seeds, which are full of the good fats our body needs, particularly the joints, but be mindful that they are also high calorie, so again, use portion control and limit your intake. Yoghurts are also good for protein, and help with calcium levels.

Smoothies are a convenient snack on the go, but be wary of what you’re putting in them, “2 parts veg to 1 part fruit” Laura recommends, to avoid it becoming to rich in natural sugars which will cause your levels to spike. Avocados, beetroots, kale, spinach, cucumber, carrots are blend-able veggies with hardly any taste once mixed together. If you then choose fruit with a distinctive taste – pineapples, mangos, mixed berries, they will then take over the taste buds. You may need to add milk or water to loosen the consistency.

Some pointers to remember;

• SHIFT thought patterns from ‘diet’ to ‘fuelling the body’

• AIM for 7 portions of fruit and veg per day

• STAY hydrated, aim between 2-3 litres per day

• EAT little and often through the day to help stabilise blood sugar levels and avoid ‘dips’

• SWAP bread, pasta and rice for the brown variety to aid digestion

• PREP is key, prepare meals and snacks the night before

To conclude, full time dancers and students require an adequate, balanced diet to not only provide them with the energy and stamina throughout the day, but to aid muscle growth and prevent injury. Without it, a dancers career would be quickly over before it had even begun. I hope this serves as a reminder to young, impressionable girls and boys out there, that dancers do in fact eat properly, if they want longevity.

Again, this information is a loose idea on they types of foods students need to be eating. There are a great many factors that contribute to differences – age, build, gender, hours spent dancing, but on the whole, this is a good guide to maintaining a healthy balance and mindset towards food. Laura and I felt so passionately about this, that we are also preparing guides to eating for performances, to get lean, and also some meal idea suggestions to take the hassle away, so watch this space!

If you don’t want to miss out, why not sign up to our website?! It’s free and you’ll receive new articles straight to your inbox! Subscribe here https://danceniche.us17.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=e45dd59903ec166f4ca174572&id=a07c82fcac

Dance Niche.

With special thanks to Laura Harrison of Dynamics Chester, for providing a wealth of nutritional knowledge www.dynamicsdanceandfitness.com

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Tap Revival – The decline and resurrection

Tap Revival – The decline and resurrection

In years gone by, teachers and studio owners noticed a growing trend of a decline in students in their tap classes. Read on for the possible causes of this and those that are championing an almighty return to greatness!

Many have put this decline down to the sheer difficulty and intricate foot and ankle technique putting students off. We all know the feeling of being almost beaten by a sequence of tap steps, you hit a wall and feel you are never going to ‘get’ it. It’s at this point that you either give up all together or push through that wall, but boy does that take A LOT of mental strength, persistence and dare I say it, stubbornness. If you don’t hold that love for tap, then you’ll most likely knock it on the head and wave your little white flag of defeat. It’s not always forever though. Teachers have commented on younger students nearly having a break from tap. They give up classes when they’re younger, only for some to return a few years down the line. This may be due to varying abilities and cognitive maturity. Children all develop at different rates, so some may be finding tap more difficult earlier on, and then want to try again when their brains are more developed and firing those signals at much quicker rate to enable them to execute the steps properly.

It has also been commented on the ‘style’ of tap being to blame. The Tap style of late was very ‘broadway’. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, I love the glamour, pizazz and sequins, but that just wasn’t ‘cool’ enough for the most recent generation of teenagers. Tap became a bit lame for want of a better word. These teens saw their parents watching those (wonderful) old MGM movies, seeing those tap routines and the getting to class and seeing the same style and steps. Teens are fickle creatures! So perhaps not wanting to lose their street cred had something to do with the decline.

However in more recent years, there’s been a steady incline in tap class numbers, but why?! Well, as mentioned before in talking about positive male ballet role models on social media, the same can be said for tap. Sisters Chloe & Maude have been something of a tapping sensation. Their prevalent presence on social media has brought a distinct new style of tap to the masses – rhythm tap. Rhythm tap is almost the polar opposite of the traditional style tap syllabuses taught in dance schools. Less about the lines and more about the sounds. Less upright and on your toes technique and more earthy, down into the ground. It’s a very free moving style, allowing your body to do whatever it needs to do to fire out the sounds from below. And that’s what makes it altogether more appealing, it looks more fun and expressive. The girl’s furious footwork often beggars belief, and you’re wondering why there aren’t any sparks coming from their shoes! They also have an infectious passion for tap that never falters, spreading the joy of creating rhythm with just your own feet where ever they time-step to!

So perhaps if you’re a studio owner, perhaps you could shake up your regular syllabus tap classes by doing a few free work rhythm tap sessions or host a rhythm tap workshop to reignite students love for the genre. Yes, it’s a very different style to traditional tap, but it can only add to your student’s roundedness as a dancer and performer, and may just inspire a new passion.

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:
Let’s Hear It For The Boys – because ballet isn’t all tutus and tiaras. (Boys Only! Photo by David Tett, courtesy Royal Academy of Dance.)

Let’s Hear It For The Boys – because ballet isn’t all tutus and tiaras. (Boys Only! Photo by David Tett, courtesy Royal Academy of Dance.)

Hear the word ballet, and you probably conjure up an image of a little girl with a pink frufru tutu on, pink ballet shoes, pink wrap cardigan, pink, pink, pink. It’s no wonder that there is a lack of boys in ballet classes! But all that is slowly starting to change.

Since time began, people have always put certain occupations and past times into little tiny stereotypical boxes. Firefighter – man, nurse – woman, football – man, ballerina – woman. You’re either pink, or blue, and woe betide you if you decide otherwise, because the whole world will try and convince you otherwise. But why?! Thank goodness that nowadays, these stereotypes are being blown apart. And the world of ballet is no exception. Don’t get me wrong, we are only just scratching the surface here, but it’s definitely a scratch in the right direction!

Perhaps most of the problem stems from the fact that previously, the majority of professional male ballet dancers were gay or at least, perceived to be. Not that that should have absolutely anything to do with it, but in years gone by, when the world was a less tolerant place than it is now, boys interested in ballet were put in another little box all of their own, that they too must be gay. Like gay was some form of insult (insert eye roll here). This would either make them quit ballet, or not start altogether for fear of being ridiculed.

Thank goodness the RAD (Royal Academy of Dance) has come up with a solution. They have recently launched a new programme, Project B. Their aim is to encourage and support more boys and men to participate in ballet classes by 2020 – the RAD’s centenary year. They want to help enrol more male dance teachers (as the teaching industry is predominantly women) to help encourage more boys to take classes and have role models to look up to.

(Iain Mackay leading a Boys Ballet Masterclass.)

They also plan, as well as many other aspects, on hosting more boys only workshops with specific male repertoire, so boys and young men won’t feel outnumbered and so discouraged from participating.

(Boys Only! Photo by David Tett, courtesy Royal Academy of Dance.)

The program has already been a huge success, and looks set to continue on the same direction. Bravo RAD. For further information on the project, visit their website http://www.royalacademyofdance.org/projectb

We all know the amazing benefits of taking regular ballet classes are – good posture, healthy supple joints, long lean muscles. It’s now become popular for football players to take ballet classes as part of their fitness regime. They might sound like polar opposites, but think about it for a second. Ballet will help with having that explosive power needed to jump into the air for that header, it will stretch everything out so that sliding tackle is less likely to cause any pulled muscles or ligaments, and it will definitely help with agility, making them light on their feet when dribbling around opponents! In fact, it’s been documented that celebrity footballers Ryan Giggs and the Ferdinand brothers take classes, and owe many attributed skills to ballet. So perhaps when young boys, who see their idols talking about going to ballet classes, they will see it in a different light and think “If they can do it, so

Social media has also helped the situation along. With the likes of Facebook, Twitter, and particularly Instagram, which hosts an impressive dance community, we now know more about celebrities and idols than ever before. We follow their daily lives, their habits, their work and home lives. Dancers are no exceptions here. Many of the professional dancers use Instagram as a way of documenting their lives and connecting with the public. Take Steven McRae for example. Steven is a Principal dancer with the Royal Ballet. He is known for his strong, sound technique and athletic performances. He is also known for being a loving family man, married to Elizabeth Harrod, a soloist with the Royal Ballet, and their 2 adorable children (really need to check out their IG accounts, seriously cute as a button, doe eyes bambinos). McRae mostly documents his dancing life, rehearsals, backstage, warm up routines and eye watering stretching, but he also indulges is with how kind and gentile he is with his wife, and how he dotes on the children. Hugely admirable stuff. He, along with countless other male dancers, are proving old stereotypes wrong. They are shouting from the rooftops that there is absolutely no shame in boys/men being dancers. They are physically strong and fit and able to express themselves fully in their roles without sexuality even being questioned. Applaudable role models.

Girls have always outnumbered boys in dance classes, but no genre more so than ballet. I hear many studio owners and teachers crying out for more boys, so we all have to ask “What can We do?” Well, advertising is key here. Most studios I’ve seen advertise their ballet classes, usually stick with the pink theme, tutu’s tiaras and sparkly wands. Not exactly shouting out to the boys! Let’s make signage more colour neutral. Let’s just have bright colours instead of a sea of pink. Let’s have some boy models on the posters. That goes for Dance shops too. Hardly the most inviting place for boys/men to come and buy their ballet gear, if the pink is glaring at you from the shop front before you’ve even got through the door! Let’s search for more male teachers, be it as permanent members of staff or one off workshops hosts, so boys have someone to aspire to. We can all play our part, no matter how small, in helping our young boys realise a dream and being confident and brave enough to follow it through.

Dance Niche

Want a bigger dance fix? Follow us:

Email newsletter

Please follow & give us a like!

Enjoy this blog? Share with your dance crew!